A proposito di Kimi

Articoli con tag “Ferrari

GP Gran Bretagna, commenti post gara–16/07/2017


My race wasn’t going too bad until a few laps before the end. I suddenly had the problem, my front left tire let go with no warning; the air stayed in the tire but the rubber part, came off. It’s disappointing because without that issue the second place was secured, and we deserved a better result. We had made some changes to the car and they seemed to have improved the feeling. When it’s like this you are confident and you can push; I hope that it will be a similar story in the future races. However, today we were lacking a little bit of speed against our rivals. We did what we could but obviously there’s some work to be done to catch up the Mercedes in places like this. This is definitely not our strongest type of circuit. I’m interested to see what happens in the next race, I guess the Hungarian track should suit our car better.

Da  Ferrari.com


Ferrari’s Raikkonen, Vettel had no warning of British GP tyre drama

Kimi Raikkonen says "everything felt normal" before the front left tyre on his Ferrari Formula 1 car suddenly failed and cost him second place in the British Grand Prix.

Raikkonen was running a comfortable second to Lewis Hamilton’s Mercedes in the closing stages of the Silverstone F1 race, when a delamination of the front left soft Pirelli on Raikkonen’s Ferrari forced him to make an unscheduled second pitstop.

The problem meant Raikkonen ultimately trailed home third, allowing Valtteri Bottas to complete a one-two result for Mercedes and help Hamilton close to within a point of Sebastian Vettel at the head of the drivers’ championship.

Vettel also suffered a front-left tyre failure, which dropped him from fourth to seventh in the race results, while Red Bull had to bring fourth placed finisher Max Verstappen into the pits for a precautionary stop.

Both Vettel and Verstappen complained about blistering on their front tyres in the second half of the race, but Raikkonen said his rubber failed without warning.

"Everything was going more or less normally," Raikkonen explained. "The gap was fine for us. Two laps from the end, I don’t know what happened – before Turn 6 [Brooklands], under the tunnel, the tyre didn’t explode but the rubber part came off suddenly.

"I don’t think I hit anything, everything felt normal before, luckily I came back.

"I struggled a bit after that because the tyre was flapping around, [but] we managed to get a decent position.

"I was very unlucky and, in a way, lucky, but didn’t want to see the same happen to Seb and then a lap later – I don’t know what happened."

Vettel was holding fourth place behind Bottas when his left front tyre deflated through Brooklands and caused Vettel to run off the track at Luffield.

He tumbled down the order as he limped the Ferrari back to the pits and saw his championship lead almost evaporate completely as he fell outside the top six.

Vettel said the tyre failure also caught him by surprise, despite feeling those vibrations during the second stint.

"I don’t think there’s anyone particularly to blame," he said. "Hindsight is great, with hindsight it is easy, but at the time it felt OK.

"Kimi had similar issues and his tyres were at least five or six laps fresher, so I think it caught us both by surprise."

Raikkonen spent the entire race in fruitless pursuit of Hamilton and said Ferrari simply lacked the pace to challenge Mercedes properly at Silverstone.

"It wasn’t the easiest feeling," Raikkonen added. "We had all weekend a few places that were quite difficult for us and in the race it was similar to Friday.

"I tried to hang on to Lewis, tried to keep the gap, but just didn’t have enough speed. We could have been second, but we have some work to be done.

"We had a decent start, but once we fall behind, we had no real chance to beat them."

Da Autosport.com


GP Austria, commenti post qualifiche–08/07/2017


Team-mate Kimi Raikkonen saw a steady improvement after a not-so-easy start: “The whole weekend had been quite tricky so far and yesterday, for certain reasons, we did not have a very good day. This morning, we basically started from zero. The feeling with the car was getting better and better, but it was not easy to recover from yesterday. The qualifying session was a bit messy, with the traffic and the yellow flags. I’m not very happy overall, but considering how tricky it has been , third place is not bad. It could have been much worse. Later this evening and tomorrow morning we will go through all the different scenarios and we’ll try to pick the best one, depending on what happens in the first lap, how the weather will be and other factors”.

Da Ferrari.com


GP Austria, commenti post libere venerdì–07/07/2017


Kimi had a slightly more troublesome day, but in the end he was not worried about the remainder of the weekend: “It was a very normal day, trying different solutions and seeing how they went. We struggled a bit with some things, but we know what is going on and we should be able to fix it. It was one of those Fridays, not great and not bad either. Obviously it could have been a bit better and straightforward, but it’s only the first day of practice. I don’t think it will be very difficult with tires as long as we do the normal things; it’s a very similar story as any other race. Now we have to go through everything and improve for tomorrow”.

Da Ferrari.com


GP Azerbaigian, commenti post gara–25/06/2017


Ferrari’s Kimi Raikkonen hits out at Valtteri Bottas after Baku hit

Kimi Raikkonen has blamed Mercedes’ Valtteri Bottas for their collision on the first lap of Formula 1’s Azerbaijan Grand Prix.

The Ferrari driver tried to pass second-placed Bottas round the outside of Turn 2 after his rival suffered excessive wheelspin on the exit of the previous corner.

Bottas kept the inside line and bounced over the kerb, pitching him into Raikkonen and pushing the Ferrari into contact with the wall.

"Not much I could have done," said Raikkonen. "I got hit at Turn 2 and there was quite a lot of damage on the car already on the left-hand side."

Raikkonen had retired from this season’s Spanish GP after contact with Bottas sent him into Max Verstappen’s Red Bull, and the Ferrari driver said the incident was similar to the one in Baku.

"He [Bottas] braked very early, again – and I think he knows it was way too early braking – and I went just outside and it was fine, and suddenly I got hit from the other side.

"So I think he noticed he braked too early and just let the brakes go, and came way too fast into me.

"It was completely his fault, but obviously I paid the price."

The stewards took no action on the coming together with Raikkonen dropping to fifth and later retiring after hitting debris from the Force India clash, while Bottas went on to finish second after passing Lance Stroll ahead of the finish line.

Bottas said that he could not have backed out of the Turn 2 battle and was surprised it ended in contact.

"From my side, you know, I was on the inside, he was obviously outside, he did brake later and he was kind of ahead but I was on the inside. So then normally… inside you have the line.

"He was turning in the corner so that for me there was nowhere else to go other than over the kerb. And for me it was not an option to back off at that point.

"So yeah, just went over the kerb, bottomed out, the car jumped and hit him and I got a puncture.

"I don’t know really, I need to have a bit more [of a] look at the videos and stuff and review it a bit more but for me it was no option to back off.

"For me I was on the inside, I thought I had the corner, there should have been space for two cars to go around.

"He was anyway a bit further ahead so maybe he could’ve kept his position anyway."

Collisions between Bottas and Raikkonen go back to 2015, when the two fought for the podium in the Russian Grand Prix before they then made contact in Mexico.

"You know, it’s a bit of a shame it’s again me and Kimi but we’ve been fighting for similar positions and it’s just unlucky that it’s us again," said Bottas.

Da Autosport.com


Today many things happened that were out of our hands and unfortunately we paid a big price. After the start, at the second corner, I got hit by Bottas; I don’t know what he was doing, he braked very early but probably he noticed that and let the brakes off, went too fast and hit me. Because of that the rear end of my car hit the wall and I had a massive damage. We were able to keep going but then I was unlucky. The two Force Indias collided, some debris flew off and destroyed my rear tire. As a consequence my whole floor and the rear wing were damaged and we decided to retire. When the red flag stopped the race we thought that we might try and go back on track. The mechanics did and amazing job, managed to change the floor and the endplate in a very short time. But obviously my car was still not perfect and we decided to stop. It’s not a good day when your car retires twice in a race. I’m disappointed because, without all these things happening, my car would have been good. There’s nothing else we could have done, we tried our best.

Da Ferrari.com


GP Canada, commenti post qualifiche–10/06/2017


Raikkonen says he paid the price for a mistake in F1 qualifying

Kimi Raikkonen said he "paid the price" for a mistake when it counted in the closing moments of Formula 1 qualifying for the Canadian Grand Prix.

The Finn, who set the pace during Friday practice, had to settle for fourth on the grid, and he believes he was capable of more than that if he hadn’t made an error on his final run.

"There was a lot of speed on the last lap, but I made a mistake in corner two," said Raikkonen.

"I improved a little bit, but I couldn’t make the lap very good, and I paid the price for it.

"It was a little bit more tricky today than yesterday just to get a good feeling with the tyres, but that’s how it goes."

While his Ferrari team-mate Sebastian Vettel ended up three tenths of a second adrift of an inspired Lewis Hamilton in the fight for pole, Raikkonen was nearly eight tenths back, which he described as "not a surprise".

"At places like this, if you get one corner wrong, you’re going to lose massive lap time," he said.

"Our car has been good, but for whatever reason we’ve struggled a bit in qualifying."

However, Raikkonen believes the race "will be a different story", with the Montreal venue traditionally throwing up unexpected circumstances and incident-packed grands prix.

"Often it’s quite a hectic race here, a lot of things happen," he said.

"You never know here, it’s one of those places things can change quite quickly.

"We’ll try again, we’ll see what happens. We should have good speed."

Da Autosport.com


Kimi Raikkonen pushes for F1 to change its blue flag rules

Kimi Raikkonen has called for a change to Formula 1’s blue flag regulations after he was caught behind traffic in the Monaco Grand Prix while fighting for the win.

Raikkonen felt he lost too much time behind backmarkers around the pitstops in Monaco, which cost him time relative to team-mate and eventual race winner Sebastian Vettel.

The subject came up in Friday’s drivers’ briefing in Montreal, where Raikkonen raised it with F1 race director Charlie Whiting.

Under the International Sporting Code drivers have "to allow the faster driver past at the first available opportunity" after the FIA blue lights in their cockpits are illuminated.

Drivers first get a "pre-warning’ when they are three seconds ahead of a car almost a lap ahead, which the FIA says "should be used by the team of the slower car to warn their driver he is soon going to be lapped and that allowing the faster car through should be considered a priority."

Last year the FIA changed the gap that automatically triggers the signals that a driver has to move over for the leading cars, reducing it from 1.5s to 1.0s.

While the reduction in time gap worked well in 2016, some drivers have reported that it has become more problematic this season because of the difficulties inherent in following other cars with the current aero package.

Following Raikkonen raising the issue in Canada, Whiting told the drivers that the gap won’t be changed, reportedly pointing out that drivers don’t seem to have any trouble when they are racing the car ahead.

Also discussed in the briefing was the question of drivers going very slowly at the approach to the final corner in Montreal as they try to create a gap in front before starting their flying lap – something Lewis Hamilton was keen to discuss with Whiting on Friday.

Carlos Sainz Jr received a reprimand after slowing and not realising that Kevin Magnussen, who was behind, was on a flying lap.

One suggestion was that drivers create their gap earlier, and don’t go slowly beyond the DRS line, which is around a third of the way along the preceding straight.

Da Autosport.com


GP Canada, prove libere venerdì–09/06/2017


Canadian GP FP2: Kimi Raikkonen fastest ahead of Lewis Hamilton

Kimi Raikkonen set the pace in the second Formula 1 practice session for the Canadian Grand Prix.

The Finn clocked a 1m12.935s at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal to finish 0.215 seconds clear of Lewis Hamilton’s Mercedes.

Championship leader Sebastian Vettel and Valtteri Bottas were third and fourth respectively with the top four separated by 0.375s.

The super-soft was the tyre of choice for the early running, before teams turned their attention to the ultra-softs for qualifying simulations.

Vettel was among the first to do his low-fuel run and promptly went quickest, with team-mate Raikkonen slotting into second.

Raikkonen then improved to go fastest, with Hamilton moving up into second and Vettel demoted to third.

Max Verstappen was the leading Red Bull in fifth, 0.453s off the pace, but his session was curtailed 20 minutes early when he stopped out on track with a gearbox problem.

The session was red-flagged while the teenager’s car was recovered from the side of the track between Turns 7 and 8.

It compounded a frustrating afternoon for the team, with Daniel Ricciardo spending most of the session in the garage after suffering an engine problem.

Felipe Massa was sixth, but he was nearly seven tenths further back in the Williams, with Fernando Alonso bouncing back from a late start to the session to go seventh at the chequered flag.

Esteban Ocon, Daniil Kvyat and Sergio Perez completed the top 10.

Romain Grosjean was 11th after he endured a frustrating session, spinning twice at Turn 6 and once at Turn 1 before ranting on the radio to his team about the situation.

Kimi Raikkonen set the pace in the second Formula 1 practice session for the Canadian Grand Prix.

The Finn clocked a 1m12.935s at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal to finish 0.215 seconds clear of Lewis Hamilton’s Mercedes.

Championship leader Sebastian Vettel and Valtteri Bottas were third and fourth respectively with the top four separated by 0.375s.

The super-soft was the tyre of choice for the early running, before teams turned their attention to the ultra-softs for qualifying simulations.

Vettel was among the first to do his low-fuel run and promptly went quickest, with team-mate Raikkonen slotting into second.

Raikkonen then improved to go fastest, with Hamilton moving up into second and Vettel demoted to third.

Max Verstappen was the leading Red Bull in fifth, 0.453s off the pace, but his session was curtailed 20 minutes early when he stopped out on track with a gearbox problem.

The session was red-flagged while the teenager’s car was recovered from the side of the track between Turns 7 and 8.

It compounded a frustrating afternoon for the team, with Daniel Ricciardo spending most of the session in the garage after suffering an engine problem.

Felipe Massa was sixth, but he was nearly seven tenths further back in the Williams, with Fernando Alonso bouncing back from a late start to the session to go seventh at the chequered flag.

Esteban Ocon, Daniil Kvyat and Sergio Perez completed the top 10.

Romain Grosjean was 11th after he endured a frustrating session, spinning twice at Turn 6 and once at Turn 1 before ranting on the radio to his team about the situation.

FP2 TIMES

Pos Driver Car Time Gap Laps
1 Kimi Raikkonen Ferrari 1m12.935s 41
2 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1m13.150s 0.215s 41
3 Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 1m13.200s 0.265s 41
4 Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 1m13.310s 0.375s 42
5 Max Verstappen Red Bull/Renault 1m13.388s 0.453s 25
6 Felipe Massa Williams/Mercedes 1m14.063s 1.128s 38
7 Fernando Alonso McLaren/Honda 1m14.245s 1.310s 19
8 Esteban Ocon Force India/Mercedes 1m14.299s 1.364s 46
9 Daniil Kvyat Toro Rosso/Renault 1m14.461s 1.526s 38
10 Sergio Perez Force India/Mercedes 1m14.501s 1.566s 41
11 Romain Grosjean Haas/Ferrari 1m14.566s 1.631s 33
12 Nico Hulkenberg Renault 1m14.604s 1.669s 38
13 Carlos Sainz Toro Rosso/Renault 1m14.621s 1.686s 43
14 Kevin Magnussen Haas/Ferrari 1m14.676s 1.741s 35
15 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull/Renault 1m15.072s 2.137s 8
16 Jolyon Palmer Renault 1m15.127s 2.192s 40
17 Lance Stroll Williams/Mercedes 1m15.240s 2.305s 40
18 Marcus Ericsson Sauber/Ferrari 1m15.611s 2.676s 31
19 Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren/Honda 1m15.624s 2.689s 20
20 Pascal Wehrlein Sauber/Ferrari 1m16.308s 3.373s 31

Da Autosport.com


Lewis Hamilton quickest for Mercedes in first Canadian GP practice

Lewis Hamilton edged out Formula 1 title rival Sebastian Vettel for the quickest time in opening Canadian Grand Prix practice.

Mercedes driver Hamilton clocked a 1m13.809s on Pirelli’s ultra-soft tyres to finish just 0.198 seconds ahead of championship leader Vettel at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal.

Hamilton’s team-mate Valtteri Bottas was third quickest, 0.237s off the pace, with Kimi Raikkonen completing the top four a further two tenths back in the second Ferrari.

The track was very dusty early on, with Raikkonen spinning on the exit of the Turn 7 chicane and Vettel following suit between Turns 1 and 2 but both continued.

Hamilton had a moment at Turn 6, the three-time world champion losing the rear turning in before catching it, while Nico Hulkenberg spun his Renault between Turns 6 and 7.

Following that scare, Hamilton set the early pace ahead of Bottas, with Mercedes beginning its programme on the super-softs and Ferrari focusing on the ultra-softs.

When Mercedes switched to the ultra-softs in the second-half of the session, Bottas and Hamilton traded fastest times.

After the first flurry of laps, it was Bottas who held the edge, the Finn 0.127s faster than his team-mate.

But Hamilton, who was told he could find time through Turns 6/7 and 8/9, hooked together a cleaner lap to sneak ahead by 0.085s.

The lap times continued to tumble as the track cleaned up, with Vettel slotting into second.

Bottas then locked up on the entry to the pits, with Mercedes determining that the front-right was too badly flat-spotted to run anymore and ending his session early.

Force India had a strong session, with Sergio Perez fifth and team-mate Esteban Ocon sixth, completing a top six within one second of each other.

Max Verstappen was the leading Red Bull in seventh, 1.052s off the pace.

Felipe Massa, Daniel Ricciardo and Daniil Kvyat rounded out the top 10.

Lance Stroll, driving in front of his home crowd, was 12th, 1.2s slower than Williams team-mate Massa.

It was not until the final third of the session that F1 returnee Fernando Alonso set his first timed lap, but soon after he was told by McLaren to stop and switch the car off immediately.

Alonso came to a halt at the hairpin, launched his headrest from the car and then threw it back into the cockpit.

McLaren later confirmed a loss of hydraulic pressure was the reason behind the stoppage, with the cause still being investigated.

Carlos Sainz Jr’s session lasted just a few corners, the Spaniard pulling off track after the hairpin on his installation lap with smoke coming from the back of his Toro Rosso-Renault.

PRACTICE ONE TIMES:

Pos Driver Car Time Gap Laps
1 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1m13.809s 36
2 Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 1m14.007s 0.198s 28
3 Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 1m14.046s 0.237s 21
4 Kimi Raikkonen Ferrari 1m14.230s 0.421s 28
5 Sergio Perez Force India/Mercedes 1m14.578s 0.769s 34
6 Esteban Ocon Force India/Mercedes 1m14.785s 0.976s 35
7 Max Verstappen Red Bull/Renault 1m14.861s 1.052s 19
8 Felipe Massa Williams/Mercedes 1m15.106s 1.297s 31
9 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull/Renault 1m15.441s 1.632s 23
10 Daniil Kvyat Toro Rosso/Renault 1m15.658s 1.849s 26
11 Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren/Honda 1m15.943s 2.134s 29
12 Kevin Magnussen Haas/Ferrari 1m16.233s 2.424s 25
13 Lance Stroll Williams/Mercedes 1m16.313s 2.504s 36
14 Romain Grosjean Haas/Ferrari 1m16.345s 2.536s 18
15 Nico Hulkenberg Renault 1m16.473s 2.664s 27
16 Fernando Alonso McLaren/Honda 1m16.521s 2.712s 13
17 Marcus Ericsson Sauber/Ferrari 1m16.805s 2.996s 24
18 Jolyon Palmer Renault 1m17.004s 3.195s 26
19 Pascal Wehrlein Sauber/Ferrari 1m17.606s 3.797s 28
20 Carlos Sainz Toro Rosso/Renault 1

Da Autosport.com


Nessuna pietà–29/05/2017


Cannibalizzato

Il viso di Kimi Raikkonen sul podio di Monte Carlo valeva più di qualsiasi parola. Il finlandese è stato annichilito dalla vittoria del ‘cannibale’ Sebastian Vettel, e ora dovrà cercare di non subire il contraccolpo psicologico di una sconfitta che potrebbe lasciargli pesanti strascichi.

La differenza tra un campione e un campionissimo sta nel canino. Vettel ha sentito l’odore del sangue e ha azzannato, senza pietà, come un moderno vampiro di rosso vestito. Raikkonen, d’altronde, ha il profilo perfetto del ‘buono’, l’ingenua preda designata del cannibale. Un’esitazione di troppo nell’avvicinarsi ai doppiati Button e Wehrlein ha fatto brillare gli occhi a Seb, che come un avvoltoio ha iniziato a braccarlo, prima di affondare il colpo grazie a una strategia rivelatasi perfetta. Per lui.

Il campionissimo, il cannibale, accentra su di sé tutte le attenzioni della propria squadra, come una primadonna carica di fascino. E volente o nolente, è sempre al posto giusto nel momento giusto. Le gomme son sempre quelle giuste, le strategie sempre le migliori a disposizione. A Monaco per Vettel tutti i tasselli del puzzle sono andati al posto giusto, per Kimi dal giro 34 si è invece frantumato tutto in mille pezzi. Sin dal rientro in pista, nuovamente dietro a Button e Wehrlein.

E l’Iceman si è sciolto, vagando lentamente e svogliatamente per tutta la seconda parte di gara. Scendendo dalla vettura non ha tradito mezzo sorriso, picconato nell’animo dalla vittoria del suo compagno di box. Sebastian non ha avuto pietà, come non la ebbe in passato con Webber, come Alonso con Massa, e ancor prima di lui Schumacher con i vari Barrichello e Irvine.

Il cannibale sorride, ti fa i complimenti pubblici, non lesina le pacche sulle spalle. Ma poi abbassa la visiera e ti azzanna, avversario tra gli avversari, appena tenti di rubargli la vittoria. Fanno tenerezza i ‘buoni’: i Kimi, i Massa, i Barrichello. Ma sono i ‘cattivi’ che si prendono le copertine, le coppe, che autografano l’albo d’oro.

Sabato la pole di Raikkonen profumava di romanticismo e di eroismo. Domenica sera il rischio è quello di vedere il finlandese trascinarsi stancamente verso fine stagione, verso il ritiro. Il mondo alla rovescia in ventiquattro ore. La psicologia di un pilota va trattata con cura. Il viso allucinato di Kimi sul podio potrebbe essere il punto di non ritorno di una carriera, come già accaduto a Rubens in Austria nel 2002, a Massa ad Hockenheim nel 2010, a Webber nel ‘Multi 21’ a Sepang nel 2013.

Nel ‘caso Raikkonen’ a Monaco 2017 non c’è però un ordine di scuderia. Ma un cannibale che ha messo a segno il delitto perfetto. Da solo?

Da Formulapassion.it